AD Collections at the Hotel de la Marine, Place De Concorde

First Published 8 April 2016

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The newly renovated entrance hall of the Hôtel de la Marine

Coinciding with PAD Paris last weekend was the opening of a fast growing 10-day event called AD Collections. We have reported on various versions of this exhibition over the past few years. This year it includes 40 interior designers, craftsmen, architects and designers for large luxury houses. Each were asked to present three pieces emblematic of their philosophies.

The work is presented by Architectural Digest and Mobilier National through Sunday in the Hôtel de la Marine on the Place de Concorde.or

Newly refurbished interiors …

The Mobilier National’s primary mission is to furnish the official buildings of the Republic around the globe and promote French culture. The government agency is also charged with maintaining the French national collection of important furniture dating to the 17th century as well as the creation of new tapestries, carpets and furniture through through the national Manufacturers (Gobelins – tapestry and and cabinet makers) that the agency oversees. The ‘atelier for Recherche et de Creation’ (ARC) is responsible for producing furniture prototypes . The ARC was created in 1964 by the current Minister of Culture, Andre Malraux, and concides with the end of France’s reconstruction and modernization period beginning in the 1950s. The atelier ARC, has since enabled the Mobilier National to evolve into the 21st century. Its mission, amongst others, is to ‘promote contemporary techniques in furniture design.’ To date, the ARC has created over 500 prototypes since its inception, calling upon nearly every accomplished French designer one can think of: from Pierre Paulin and Olivier Mourgue in the 70s, to Garouste and Bonetti and Martin Szekely in the 1980s and the Bourroullec brothers Ronan and Erwan in the 1990s.

Here are some highlights incase you can’t make it this weekend!
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Elliot Barnes, the American interior designer in Paris known for the Ruinart Champagne headquarters projects and many private partmentain Paris and hotels such as Ritz Carlton in Wolfsburg Germany and many private apartment, created an ‘undressing’ mirror because ones needs are different at the end of an evening … It is constructed of panel of stained glass, a hand stitched shelf for a watch of earnings and a black lacquered structure inspired by work of fashion designer Azzedine Alaia. His hand blown glass tabouret, Les Sables du temps, marks every half hour in time, and his console Zuma, is inspired by waves in California and incorporates seaweed that influences the feeling of movement.

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‘Meubles Bijoux’ by Kam Tin, a designer from Hong Kong who made a very limited production of his work. His brand was purchased by Maison Rapin and today it flourishes with creations like those above covered in pyrite and turquoise. Other creations include rock crystals and amber.

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This is the fauteuil ‘Cerise’ by Eric Schmitt in Black-lacquered wood, polished bronze and velvet (L82 x l82 x h78 cm). Schmitt recently opened atelier in the Marais for private clients.

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Desk by Noé Duchaufour Lawrence in oak, linen and leather, Made for the Atelier de Research (ARC) by Mobilier National

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Coffee table by Emmanuel Bossuet, a graphic artist and artistic director in Pars who has been involved in fashion and creates furniture collections.

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A hand sculpted marble-yop table by interior designer Stephanie Coutas.

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Patricia Urquiola’s Swing Chair and stool for Louis Vuitton

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18th century tassels ….

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Fauteuil Racket by Humberto and Fernando Campana for Carpenters Workshop Gallery

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Beautiful pattern and patina!

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