Patrick Jouin

First Published 8 August 2014

Screen Shot 2014-08-07 at 2.33.44 AM

ONE_SHOT.MGX STOOL, 2006

This stool by Patrick Jouin is entirely 3D printed (aka stereolithography), using a process called laser sintering. This means it’s all self contained, one piece, no assembly required. It is printed (including hinges) in ‘one shot’! 3D printing enables the realization of designs such as this one that would be otherwise quite impossible to make using traditional skills.  Up until the point of this collection 3D printing had only been used for prototypes and small objects. This collection marks a pivotal moment in design.
This piece is in the permanent collections of MoMA, NY  
and the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, NY.  

Screen Shot 2014-08-07 at 2.36.44 AM

Click on the image above to link to a little video showing the stool being opened and closed.

Screen Shot 2014-08-07 at 2.40.13 AM

BLOOM TABLE LAMP 
Image courtesy of Thomas Duval and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Inspired by flower blossoms and the One_Shot.MGX stool this lamp continues Jouin’s exploration of the possibilities of 3d printing. This piece is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Arts and Design, NY. 
~~

patrick-jouin-solid-chair-red

C2 chair from the Solid Collection, 2006

Click on the image above to link to the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt catalogue entry for this design, which in now in their permanent collection. The chair has also been sought after in the auction markets. Here is a link to a very well sold C2 chair at Phillips a while back.  (This chair is also in the permanent collection at MoMA.) This chair was made in a limited edition of 30.

mix-las-vegas-alain-ducasse493-Velib__JCDecaux_9e87284fb3

French designer Patrick Jouin worked for Philippe Starck before setting up his own shop in 1999. Soon after setting up shop he met and collaborated with  Michelin-starred chef Alain Ducasse for the interior architecture of his restaurants Plaza Athenée in Paris, The Dorcester in London and Mix in Las Vegas, which is pictured above. Since then he has continually proven himself to be a very important contemporary designer on the international stage whose problem solving skills traverse the wide spectrum of design.  More recent projects include the design of the Velib terminals in Paris and interiors for the Abbey in the Loire Valley, which just opened this spring.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s